Wildcat’s Ten Favorite Wii Games (Updated 8/22/2012)

The Wii is a weird little system, that it is. It’s full of crap, shovelware and licensed drivel, but if you can look past all of that there’s some mighty good stuff to be found. It isn’t as rich as Nintendo’s past consoles in terms of overall quality, but there’s easily ten games to choose as my favorites that I feel are worth some playtime.

Resident Evil 4: Wii Edition (Capcom)

Cheat, foul, you say! You JUST talked about RE4 for the ‘Cube! Well, yes, but this port is the BEST version of the game, thus it’s the greatest game the Wii has, so I can’t fault the game so being that good, now, can I?

New Super Mario Bros. Wii (Nintendo)

In terms of 2D Mario adventures, this wondrous romp is second best (not much can top the glories of Super Mario 3 for me). The game has splendid level design, offered so many great resurrections of Mario lore, and is a hoot to play through. Best original game the Wii offers.

A Boy & His Blob (Majesco/Wayforward)

This may surprise you a bit, but Wayforward’s gorgeous reinvention of a dusty NES concept exceeds its source material and breezes past nearly every other game the console features. It’s lush visually, stuns aurally, and features some grand puzzling that I adored.

Xenoblade Chronicles (Nintendo/Monolith Soft)

I haven’t finished Xenoblade’s epic quest yet, but it is a well-crafted RPG, that it most certainly is. I like the setting, the characters, the combat and the music, and I think it was definitely worth the wait. This will adjust when I finish it, but at present I can say it deserves this high a rank.

Super Mario Galaxy 2 (Nintendo)

Galaxy was a great way to redeem Sunshine’s mediocre outing for the ‘Cube, putting Mario back on track with success. However, Galaxy 2 refines and polishes Galaxy’s concepts and levels so well that it blows it out of the water (or stratosphere; a little more appropriate). Mario came back in a big way on the Wii, and this is another solid reason why.

Muramasa: The Demon Blade (Ignition/Vanillaware)

Aye, color me shocked I loved Muramasa so much after the bitter sting of Odin Sphere’s disappointment.  The gameplay is smoother, more action-driven and friendlier to the player, and the world is beautiful, gripping and intense. Easily the best pure action game on the Wii.

Kirby’s Epic Yarn (Nintendo/Good Feel/HAL Labs)

I haven’t dug a Kirby game this much in years, and it’s curious that it took a drastic revision of what makes Kirby platforming work to do it. Incredible visual design combines with mellow yet engaging gameplay (that ramps up nicely along the way), melding into a fantastic gem of a platformer. May I say the Wii made platforming awesome again?

Dead Space Extraction (EA/Visceral)

The game that launched my interest in Dead Space, Extraction is a very well designed rail shooter that, while not up to the high standards of its PS3/360 cousins, is a gripping, tense and enjoyable thrill ride to experience.

Little King’s Story (XSEED/Marvelous/CiNG/Town Factory)

This kooky strategy-action game smacks of Pikmin (combat), Ogre Battle 64 (soldier customization) and Sim City (town management) rolled into one…and it’s very good! It has some cheap enemies that annoyed me enough to take a break, but on the whole Little King’s Story has earned the praise it garnered.

Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Nintendo/HAL Labs/GameArts)

Brawl is the best in the series of chaotic…brawlers starring Nintendo’s wide array of characters, and it’s the large roster, dynamic setpieces and pure insanity that does it for me. Some prefer the first or Melee, but Brawl’s by far my choice.

Contenders:

Zack & Wiki: Quest for Barbaros’ Treasure (Capcom)

Tatsunoko Vs. Capcom (Capcom)

Deadly Creatures (THQ/Rainbow Studios)

Sin and Punishment: Star Successor (Nintendo/Treasure)

Super Mario Galaxy (Nintendo)

 

 

Wildcat’s Favorite Franchises – Super Mario

Sometimes there’s a game that just seizes upon you, and you become so taken with it that you need more to satisfy some inner longing built from its excellence.  In these cases, there’s been plenty of ample sequels or prequels to fulfill that itch for me.  These are the franchises I have been following the closest over my gaming existence, the ones that I hold the highest standards to and anticipate the greatest.  They are not in any real order, because that would be agonizing to determine what I love more.  It’s hard enough with individual games – uniting them all would be a nightmare.  However, I will go into what game left the impact and which of the series I adore the most, as well as discuss each game I have (or have not, and explain why) played and its furthering impact upon my feelings.  There’s nine that I consider the finest – let’s finish up the Mario Madness at last.

Super Mario (Nintendo)

Game That Left the Impact – Super Mario Bros. (NES)

The Game I Adore – Super Mario 64 (NES)

I owe an incredible debt to Nintendo for Super Mario Bros. – I was hooked on Donkey Kong, but it was Super Mario Bros. that really got me into gaming in my youth.  It wasn’t until SMB that I became an avid fanatic of this lovely medium, and it was this franchise that kept me loving it more and more as I picked up further chapters.  SMB3 began my interest in gaming design, my interest in role-playing (which led to my drama degree), my early improvements in drawing, and cementing me as a diehard Mario Maniac.  I suppose that as time’s gone on, I’ve cut Mario the most slack due to his incredible history, with only one game not resonating with me all that well (Sunshine, which may have been obvious).  I love the wacky world of the Mushroom Kingdom, and admit to giving Mario an edge whenever game purchasing decisions are on the line…which more often than not come out aces.  But, I think I’ve babbled enough here – let’s focus on the games.

What I’ve Tried

Super Mario Bros. (NES) – What more could I say beyond it was the game that got me all addicted to playing games?  An innovation that has left its mark on gaming forever.

Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) – While it goes off the beaten path (and takes the scenic route), I like SMB2 a lot, too.  It’s not as solid as SMB and SMB3, but it’s a well-made game in its own right, and its imprint on the franchise is unquestionable.

Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) – The finest of the 2D adventures, a earth-shaking titan of the industry, and one hell of a way to spend an afternoon.  I need to replay this. XD

Super Mario World (SNES) – A good game, without a doubt, but I’ve never quite resonated with it as much as other games in the series.  It’s charming and challenging, and I’m not questioning its placement in the Super Mario canon, but I’ve just not enjoyed it the same way as others.  *shrugs*

Super Mario 64 (N64) – This revolutionary attempt to bring Mario into three dimensions remains my favorite of the series, and is one of my absolutes.  I’d take it to a desert island.

Super Mario Sunshine (GC) – This is the one Mario I think is a bit of a disgrace to the name.  It feels unpolished, gimmicky, and convoluted.  I don’t miss owning it.

New Super Mario Bros. (DS) – A good, but conservative return to the 2D plane.  A flawed save system and hokey boss fights don’t help much.  The sequel, however…

Super Mario Galaxy (Wii) - A fun romp soaring through the galaxy, but also feels a little refrained.  And again, the sequel…

New Super Mario Bros. Wii (Wii) – The best Nintendo-made Wii game.  Case closed.

Super Mario Galaxy 2 (Wii) – Creative, crazy and improved, this is a brilliant sequel that only stumbles at the very end…but not all that badly.  I’d recommend this over the first Galaxy for its overall awesomeness.

What Haven’t I Played?

Super Mario Land and Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins – I’ve bypassed the two Super Mario Land titles on my list, but it’s more due to the distance of time since I’ve played them than deliberate omission.

Super Mario 3D Land (DS) – No 3DS to give it a shot!

What Makes It One of the Best?

Kookiness – Super Mario games have from the outset done some weird things.  Mario eats a mushroom and grows bigger?  He can sink into pipes?  Hit coins out of blocks?  Find hidden coin vaults?  Battle hammer throwing turtles and cloud-riding creatures who throw endless amounts of eggs covered in spines that hatch to reveal spike-covered beetles?  The audacity to be imaginative is what drives this franchise home for me.  If the game feels at all restricted (like Sunshine and New SMB), I lose the connection.  My favorites are unhinged.

Stellar Level Design – The best Mario titles feature amazing levels that are wonderfully memorable.  Level 5-3 in SMB3, Hazy Maze Cave in SM64, the final gauntlet with Bowser in New SMB Wii…and countless others in most of the other games.

Beyond Perfect Controls – Mario set the standard for platformers in terms of tightness and responsiveness, and man, it’s hard for anyone, including Nintendo, to reach that plateau.  But, despite a few setbacks here and there, Super Mario games tend to continue the fine tradition by being some of the greatest games to control in the industry.

Infectious Music – Koji Kondo and his allies over the years have given gaming some of its aural treasures, and half the joy for me is hearing how well the music is in a Mario title.  Luckily, I’ve rarely been disappointed.

Power-Ups Aplenty – The last major factor for me digging a Mario game is Mario’s ever-growing repertoire of items, abilities and suits that grant him new powers.  Starting small with the Super Mushroom, Fire Flower and Starman, Mario’s got a small warehouse packed with excellent game enhancers by now, and I’m sure it won’t slow down anytime soon.  It’s always a pleasure to see what Nintendo’s cooked up for Mario to utilize this go-around, and while some end up falling flat on their face (the Koopa suit from NSMB, for example), most are really, really pleasurable to try out.

New Super Mario Bros. Wii – Pure Unadultered Bliss

New Super Mario Bros. Wii (Wii)
Pub/Dev: Nintendo
ESRB: E/Players: 1 – 4

After a drought of 18 years following Super Mario World, Nintendo released the next proper sequel in the Super Mario Bros. line on a console (I’m not counting Yoshi’s Island, which I consider a spin-off, part of the main family), New Super Mario Bros. Wii.  Taking the rudimentary concepts and engine from the DS New Super Mario Bros., Nintendo decided to really go all out with this latest chapter, resurrecting the Koopalings (who had not seen any real action since SMW, beyond their last major appearance in Yoshi’s Safari and their cameo boss fights in Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga), several enemies not seen in decades, bringing back Yoshi (although in a more limited format than in SMW), adding in some mechanics from Super Mario Bros. 2 (picking up POW Blocks and other items beyond shells), and then building a fantastic game around all of these aspects, Nintendo produced what very well could be the finest original game on the Wii.  I consider it as such.

First off, let me admit that I am a HUGE fan of the Koopalings.  I think that that may have been obvious, at the rate I’ve blabbered on about them in this series of features, but I used to role-play as them as a kid.  I thought they were just awesome, and seeing them return in such a glorious manner made me ecstatic.  They were updated but with great care, with Iggy and Lemmy seeing the more radical of the alterations (which the two were my favorites, and it took a bit to adjust to their new looks, but I think these are improvements).  Seeing these guys (and Wendy) back and with better characterization than they ever had before was a treat.  Luckily for me, that wasn’t the only modification that works in New SMB Wii’s favor.

In fact, this embellishment of everything Mario was a fan’s dream come to life.  Nintendo went through the archives and dug up nearly every major adversary of consequence in the series and brought them back (save Shyguys, who are a notably absent foe on an otherwise rich roster of baddies) beautifully.  Seeing Spike, the spiked ball-vomiting turtle, for example, made me smile.  And I continued to smile bigger and bigger as more and more classics made their appearances.  In fact, since these New SMB articles have corresponding Opinion pieces, let me pluck a choice piece about the enemies I wrote a while back after playing the game through:

Anyone who’s been attached with Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World will smile and laugh as they plow through this game’s many levels.  The sheer amount of retro enemy returns, gameplay mechanics, and musical throwbacks is astounding.  World 1 is pretty standard fare, but World 2 throws SMB3′s Spike, Fire Chomps, Boomerang and Fire Brothers, and Firesnakes at you, for example.  Further down the road, Big Boss Bass (AH!!!), Sledge Brothers, Mini Goombas, Mecha Koopas, Ptooies, Rocky Wrenches, Fuzzys, and a plethora of other baddies from the past await you, and I must have just looked like the happiest man of earth.  Seeing so many old foes return in such a glorious manner…I giggled in sheer delight each time I saw somebody reappear after so long.  And more just keep popping up as you go through the game.  It’s clear that Nintendo hasn’t forgotten all of these great designs from the past.

And the Koopalings?  How did their battles fare after such a long hiatus?

And the Koopalings!  BEST MARIO BOSS FIGHTS EVER.  Seriously.  Larry is pretty straightforward, but the tricks they throw at you as you go further along are just incredible.  I won’t spoil them here (honestly, you need to experience them!), but Iggy and Ludwig’s second rounds were by far some of the greatest 2D boss showdowns I’ve ever done.

And Bowser?  Did he recover from two humiliating scenarios that were just freakishly weird (Sunshine’s sauna encounter and New SMB’s voodoo-inspired oddity) and continue the greatness Galaxy presented?

And then…there’s the final fight with Bowser.  My god.  I thought the final fight in Galaxy was Bowser’s shining moment.  Nope, Nintendo topped themselves with an epic showcase that MUST be played to believe.  It’s as fun as it looked online and then some.  I tell you, the Wii and Bowser battles are ALL RIGHT.

That’s enough quoting myself for now.  I’ll get a fat head if I keep at it. XD

The levels have built upon New SMB’s foundation, rivaling the best of the previous games.  Many awesome set-pieces, crazy concepts and the aforementioned enemy throwbacks made each level a pleasure to explore.  The game’s also in line with the Marios of the past in difficulty, which can be tough at times, but nowhere near as complicated as some press outlets want you to believe.  New players who have some problems will find the Super Guide option a nice way to learn the mechanics of Mario, while veterans will likely not even see it at all.  The music continues on expanding the New SMB theme, but there’s plenty of great musical shout-outs to the past as well.  And last but not least, the new power-ups are fantastic, and have been much more integrated with the game than New SMB’s.  The Ice Flower from Galaxy and returning Mini Mushroom, along the Starman/Super Mushroom/Fire Flower standbys, are joined by two new suits, the Propeller Suit and the Penguin Suit.  The Propeller Suit requires a quick shake of the Wiimote to launch, and it’s a nice new way to fly.  The Penguin Suit combines the Frog Suit from SMB3 with the Ice Flower and the sliding proclivity of the Koopa Suit from New SMB, giving Mario a great swimming skill and the ease to conquer ice levels by slipping through them on your tummy.  Yoshi is back, too, as I mentioned, and he’s pretty much like you remember from SMW.

All and all, I was delighted with the quality and love that went into this game.  It’s the best reason to own a Wii (outside of Resident Evil 4, but I have a bias toward that one XD ), and it’s the best Mario in years.  Well worth the investment to experience and enjoy!

Next week, the Galaxies will be discussed, and we’ll properly wrap up this Mario celebration!

Bowser and the G-Men – Awesome Enemy Encounters

DANGER – SPOILERS GO FLYING IN THE ACTUAL POST!  Continue on if you don’t mind finding out what the final boss fight in New Super Mario Bros. Wii is!

(more…)

News Round-Up: 12/11/2009

How are these round-ups working out for everyone?  I think it’s better to split out major reports of personal interest, and lump smaller items into one post.  I hope this layout pleases you as much as it does me. :)

Additional Lufia DS details, screens and art, and Siliconera also has some details and screens here.  I’m getting quite stoked by this game.

Iwata Asks tackled Miyamoto a little while ago – now it’s Takashi Tezuka and Toshihiko Nakago’s turn.  These two have been involved with Mario titles since the beginning, and this revealing conversation unveils many Mario mythos in the process.

A new promo trailer of Capcom’s awesome looking Ghost Trick.  Clever cameo hunters will spot a certain famous ace attorney lurking in there, which only adds to its coolness.

The Euro trailer for Fragile Dreams has come out, and it’s very spooky and atmospheric looking.  I’m very hyped for this game.

New Super Mario Bros. Wii (Spoilers)

New Super Mario Bros. Wii
Pub/Dev: Nintendo
ESRB: E/Players: 1 – 4

(Since the game’s so new, I’ll try to keep my spoilers to a minimum.  But I’m so giddy about certain things that I’m going to talk about them, so if you’re the kind of person who needs to know nothing about a Mario title before you play it, refrain from continuing on!  Just know that the game is FANTASTIC!)

Nintendo’s been a little iffy towards hardcore fans so far this generation, catering mainly to casual and non-gamers with their Wii “insert genre here” titles.  Sure, we’ve had a dash of Mario, Zelda, Smash Bros. and Metroid to whet our hunger (and I’m not saying any of them are bad!  Most of them have been excellent!), but the overwhelming deluge of casual focus has left me a little uncertain of Nintendo’s future…and of what I should feel about them these days as a company.  I consider them the best of the best, my personal favorite and a huge inspiration for who I am, but watching their transition from then to now has been…well, a rather bizarre and unsettling trip, to put it mildly. 

So, back when this game was first revealed at E3, as if they wanted to alienate their old-time gamers who’ve been following them through thick and thin, they announce that a new demo mode would be packed in.  Stunned silence was quickly beset by panic, then by frustration.  A guide, we said?  Who needs a guide in a Mario title?  Nintendo’s gone too far!  They’ve lost touch with their fans!  (profanity)!…etc.  I remember those chaotic days, and was more than a little pissed myself about the inclusion of a hand-holding device in NSMBWii…even before we knew how it worked!  Irate feelings grew among my NinDB comrades, and only a mere few had the rationality to take the “wait-and-see” approach (I’m looking at you, Nester ;) ) in regards to how the mode would turn out.  Months later, as the game got closer to completion and we got to hear more about it, the anger subsided.  And now, I don’t even know what I was mad about in the first place.  As the details of the “Super Guide” became clear, I felt I had possibly overreacted.  It’s easy to do when something important to you changes in ways you aren’t pleased about, I guess.

Watching clips of NSMBWii the last few weeks erased the fears I held for the game.  It looked FUN.  So, I took a chance and bought it.  I haven’t purchased a new game all year.  Something about the way the gameplay looked…it compelled me to break down and buy it at full price.  I eagerly hoped that it would live up to the old Marios, and would push well beyond the scope New Super Mario Bros. on the DS did.  While that was a fine game, and I think of it highly, I think that Ninty played it a little safe.  Overusing Bowser Jr., mostly uninteresting boss fights, uninspiring power-ups, and a stupid save system (to be frank) hurt it.  The level designs were great, but it wasn’t the same experience as playing SMB3 or SMW. 

So, after I started up NSMBWii, tinkered around, made my way through the game and vanquished Bowser, I thought, man.  Did Nintendo push.

New Super Mario Bros. Wii is some of the most fun I’ve had with a game in a long time.  This is nostalgia done right.  Anyone who’s been attached with Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World will smile and laugh as they plow through this game’s many levels.  The sheer amount of retro enemy returns, gameplay mechanics, and musical throwbacks is astounding.  World 1 is pretty standard fare, but World 2 throws SMB3’s Spike, Fire Chomps, Boomerang and Fire Brothers, and Firesnakes at you, for example.  Further down the road, Big Boss Bass (AH!!!), Sledge Brothers, Mini Goombas, Mecha Koopas, Ptooies, Rocky Wrenches, Fuzzys, and a plethora of other baddies from the past await you, and I must have just looked like the happiest man of earth.  Seeing so many old foes return in such a glorious manner…I giggled in sheer delight each time I saw somebody reappear after so long.  And more just keep popping up as you go through the game.  It’s clear that Nintendo hasn’t forgotten all of these great designs from the past.  And the Koopalings!  BEST MARIO BOSS FIGHTS EVER.  Seriously.  Larry is pretty straightforward, but the tricks they throw at you as you go further along are just incredible.  I won’t spoil them here (honestly, you need to experience them!), but Iggy and Ludwig’s second rounds were by far some of the greatest 2D boss showdowns I’ve ever done.  And then…there’s the final fight with Bowser.  My god.  I thought the final fight in Galaxy was Bowser’s shining moment.  Nope, Nintendo topped themselves with an epic showcase that MUST be played to believe.  It’s as fun as it looked online and then some.  I tell you, the Wii and Bowser battles are ALL RIGHT.

The levels themselves are varied, with unique gameplay elements, enemies and secrets to discover.  Many of the stages also made me smile.  There’s some innovation going on here!  The use of light in some levels was ingenious, and one level has you leaping into bubbles of water in a Galaxy-esque manner.  Just some awesome stuff that’s ideal to run through.  The much-touted difficulty is perfectly ramped from beginning to end, and Mario veterans should feel right at home here.  It’s nowhere near as hard as some press sources were saying (I beat it in four days!  I never summoned the Super Guide in that time!  I had plenty of lives, and probably died a max of 5 times in a couple levels!).  I think either they’re getting soft in their offices or haven’t played a 2D Mario in a while. :p  And the power-ups are a vast improvement over NSMB’s.  The Propeller Suit, a nice resurrection of flying (how many different ways can one fly now in the Mushroom Kingdom, BTW?  There’s no need for planes with Super Leaves, Cape Feathers, Lakitu clouds, Wing Caps, FLUDD’s and Propeller Mushrooms roaming about :p ), uses shakes from the WiiMote to gain lift, which works 90% of the time the way it should (I’ll get to that in a minute).  The Penguin Suit is cute, combining elements of the Frog Suit, Mario 64’s sliding and Galaxy’s Ice Flower (which also joins the power-up parade) in a successful way.  The Mini Mushroom’s back, which was the most practical power-up from NSMB, and it works about the same.  Yoshi also returns, although he’s very limited in his use here, popping up in about 3 – 5 stages and being unable to leave said stages.  Still, he’s fun to use, and eating various foes remains a hoot like it was in SMW.

The controls are very NES-like: the control pad and two buttons do the majority of the gameplay’s work (and they do it up to the Mario standard, which is nigh-perfect), with additional help from shaking or moving the WiiMote.  The WiiMote integration is mostly well thought out, with several clever level designs coming from its use.  The problem is that the WiiMote is required to do tasks you might not expect it to.  Case in point – picking up any object that is not a shell.  You’ll have to hold 1 and then shake the WiiMote to lift Toad, ice blocks, barrels, POW blocks (nice to see such a classic Mario item in proper use again), Propeller blocks, and other similar objects.  It takes a bit of an adjustment to wrap your head around TWO ways of picking up things, which to me is a little convoluted and unnecessary.  To leap off Yoshi, you’ll also have to shake the WiiMote, which also takes time to compensate for.  The Propeller Suit requiring a shake makes sense, but at times it reacts when you don’t want it to (like trying to use the WiiMote to control stage scenery) or quick enough (usually in last-second reflexive situations).  Lastly, Spin Jumps almost seem tacked on.  It lets you sling Ice or Fireballs in both directions, but it can also screw up your timing if done at an inconvenient time.  I almost wonder if holding the B Trigger would have improved things.  All and all, it works most of the time, but occasional mishaps will occur.

The game looks and sounds like Mario.  That’s the best compliment I can give it.  The graphics are solid, with some neat special effects (The Koopaling and Kamek’s magic, the lava sparks, and the aforementioned lighting in particular), excellent animation, and the models looks crisp and sharp.  It’s not the finest looking Wii game, but it’s up there, and it certainly works for Mario.  The music brings back several classic tunes (the Hammer Bros. remix is really cool, especially the little fanfare at the end), and all of it is well composed and catchy.  Easily some of the best Mario music (another good cross of Wii and Mario – music that soars!) in the franchise’s history.

The multiplayer mode I can comment a little on – Grace and I have played through a bit of World 1 together, and it’s a lot of fun as well.  I’ve always wanted to be able to tackle a Mario game with a friend, and so far, I haven’t been disappointed.  I don’t know if 4 players is as entertaining or sensible as 1 or 2, but I’ll update this if I get the chance to try it out.

The somewhat long-winded intro to this Opinion had a purpose – to show that I had doubts about Nintendo’s current direction.  They’ve made some strange decisions that really seem to be a deliberate insult to their fanbase, and their game focus has curved onto a new path that tends to leave hardcore gamers adrift in unclear waters (there’s plenty of exceptions…Sin & Punishment 2, anyone?  But I’m speaking in general terms).  New Super Mario Bros. Wii may have been saddled with a casual-friendly Super Guide, but you know what?  Mario masters will never see it.  I can’t even tell you what it does.  I never had to deal with it in my playtime.  But if such a mode helps teach casual and non-gamers about the core mechanics of Mario, gets them addicted to the intensely gratifying gameplay and level design of this game, and they then download the classic games that inspired this beauty on the VC, then I’m all for it.  I hope some may find the beauty without any help, much like I did when I was young (which was the reason for my ire).  For those who grew up with Mario in the 80’s and 90’s, you’ll find plenty to like here.  Nintendo may be after a different market these days, but this game highlights that they still can put together one hell of a game, one that rekindles exactly why I adore them as a developer.

Open Forum: Nintendo’s Demo Mode

I’d like to discuss how we truly feel about Nintendo’s decision to include a demo mode in New Super Mario Bros. Wii that allows the CPU to take over your player to help inexperienced/casual gamers get past trickier parts of the game to be able to conquer it. 

I do not like this idea. I play games for the enjoyment of getting through it. Platformers by default need to have some sense of challenge to be engaging, and this feature is stripping that aspect out of the game. Honestly, I’d rather fail a stage multiple times and then manage to finally best it and feel incredibly hyped about it over getting stuck and pressing a button to let the CPU weave and bop their way past some difficult part merely to see the ending of the game any day. I think it’s a cop-out, and I’m frightened at the potential generation of gamers Nintendo will be suckling with this addition. I don’t want to see a Metroid or a Zelda with this mode. It’ll complete defeat the purpose of playing it to me. Those two series pride themselves on discovery and exploration, and a demo mode will erase those elements out of existence, forcing you straight through the game with little reward outside of the ending, and not being able to relish the little quirks and secrets that make them special. Zelda and Metroid are the two most important franchises to my gaming heart, and it may be paranoid to begin worrying about this Demo mode sneaking its way into Other M or Zelda Wii/Spirit Trackers, but Nintendo’s given me little reason not to be concerned. And it bothers the hell out of me.

Your thoughts?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 141 other followers